Market Watch

Peanuts May Be In Excess, But Consumption Is Still Positive

planting seed

For a peanut farmer, it’s hard to get excited about 2018. Contract prices are down $100 per ton, or most of the possible profit, the generic base that allowed a base payment on peanut base and converted cotton base is gone, prices for about all inputs are up including seed and fertilizer, farm labor is almost impossible to find and ... Read More »

Still A Couple Of Years From Supply And Demand Balance

mw loading peanuts

The 2018 peanut market for farmers was already weak because of a large carryover from 2017. The cotton amendment in the recent U.S. budget resolution has jolted the peanut market and changed the dynamics for 2018. Generic base, which after the last Farm Bill could have been planted in peanuts, is gone. Read More »

Many Uncertainties Remain As Planting Approaches

USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service has lowered the peanut crop estimate for 2017. The early prediction of 3,819,500 tons may have been possible until the hurricane and late drought caused the peanut crop to shut down. Scientists are still scratching their heads a bit at what caused the fairly significant yield reduction. The final crop estimate was still a record ... Read More »

Will a reduced crop estimate make a difference in contract offers?

Making plans for the 2018 peanut marketing year will be difficult. All markets are aware that we have a few too many peanuts. The U.S. peanut crop for 2017/18 was revised down 2 percent in the November Crop Production report to 7.64 billion pounds (3,819,500 tons) based on slightly lower yields. Georgia, Alabama and Florida account for most of this ... Read More »

Crop Expected to Top Previous Record By 15 Percent

Wow. What a peanut crop! It is difficult to be critical of over production knowing that the world needs your nutritious product to help solve hunger. One in every nine people goes to bed hungry each night. One cannot criticize Mother Nature for blessing the peanut nation with the ideal growing season, which produced a top quality crop. Records were ... Read More »

Peanuts Need A Profitable Rotation Partner To Stem Yield Decline

  Peanuts are a shining star in the agricultural “tool box” as growers have been offered reasonable early contracts and the world is demanding more peanuts. Producers are usually optimistic when they smell fresh-plowed dirt and can look forward to a bountiful harvest at the end of the season, even when prices are not so good. However, peanut optimism is ... Read More »

Times Are Good, But Key Market Factors Bear Watching

  Peanut farmers prepare for the 2017 peanut crop in good condition, marketing wise. There is no surplus of 2016 crop peanuts, except for a few lots with European Union edible quality, mostly jumbo runners. The market is very tight and that is likely to continue domestically until December 2017. Export markets will be influenced by the present crop in ... Read More »

No Excess In U.S. Supply, But Watch Other Origins

  The final numbers are almost in on U.S. peanut production from 2016. USDA predicted 2,842,305 farmer-stock tons, while the Federal Crop Inspection Service has counted 2,770,299 tons. The numbers are short of the October prediction of 3,155,100 tons. Lack of rain the last 90 days of the growing season caused both quality and quantity issues. The new numbers are ... Read More »

Strong Contracting Confirms Need For More Peanuts

  Down on the farm, producers are somewhat optimistic as domestic and export demand for peanuts remains strong. Other commodities do not produce such optimism, but prices have improved since Trump was elected President. Peanut producers need a strong crop for rotation. Early indications are for an acreage increase. The first estimate will be issued by USDA on March 30. ... Read More »

Market Watch

Demand For U.S. Peanuts Remains Strong At Home And Abroad The peanut nation has experienced some unusual occurrences that may impact the growth and expansion of the U.S. peanut industry for years. In producing the 2016 crop, these challenges came about as a complete surprise and were met with mixed reviews. First, USDA statisticians over estimated the carryforward from 2015 ... Read More »