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2010 Peanut Rx

Know where the varieties you select fit in the risk index

Amanda Huber print email

 
The 2010 version of Peanut Rx has been released by researchers and Extension specialists at the University of Georgia, University of Florida and Auburn University. Changes to the risk index, based on observations and data from the 2009 season, can be found in the cultivar/variety section.

Because of the number of new varieties available in seed quantity enough for planting larger acreages, producers are reminded to see where those varieties fit into the index, even if the variety offers an improved disease resistance package.

Variety Selection Is One Factor

“The first question is about varieties,” says James Hadden, technical support representative for Syngenta Crop Protection, “and growers need to be aware of where their variety is in the risk model.

“There are some new varieties that can help some growers in terms of reducing their fungicide input, but that’s part of the total package. They need to look at all the factors.”

Syngenta Crop Protection was the first company to tailor a prescription program using Peanut Rx.

Bob Kemerait, University of Georgia Extension plant pathologist, says “Syngenta was the first to come out and say, if you follow Peanut Rx and find that you are at low risk, we have a four-spray program for you. If you are at high risk, we have a seven-spray program for you.”

More Companies Establish Programs

“In 2009, there was Syngenta with Abound, Nichino with Artisan and Convoy, Arysta Life Science with Evito and BASF with Headline,” Kemerait says. “In less than five years, we have had crop protection companies with seven-spray programs to now say ‘if you manage your crop well, show us the reduced risk, we’ll work with you to spray fewer times.’”

The Benefit Of Good Management

Kemerait says the Peanut Rx prescription fungicide program is based on putting the right amount of fungicide into a field based on risk.

“If you have a high risk from short rotations, growing soybeans, less resistant varieties, you need to spray at least seven times, and with a wet year like we had last year, eight or nine times may be needed to maintain yields.

“But if you’ve got good rotation, resistant varieties, good management, you may be able to get away with only four or five sprays,” he says. “The important thing is that the prescription program is a tangible way to benefit from using good management.”

Look At Different Scenarios

“What’s neat about the index is that you can go along and play ‘what if’ scenarios in terms of risk management,” Hadden says.

Besides the factors pointed out on the disease risk index, other factors, such as weed management, can play a role in disease management.

“Good weed control affects your ability to manage diseases,” Hadden says. “If weeds are intercepting the fungicides, it will decrease your level of control.”

Looking at the total package for peanut production, hopefully producers can continue to keep disease problems to a minimum and reduce input costs with good management. PG

Variety selection
  Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
Variety     White mold Limb rot
AP-4 20 20 15 unknown
AT 3085RO 15 30 25 unknown
C-99R 20 15 15 25
Florida-07 10 20 15 unknown
Georgia Green 30 20 25 15
Georgia Greener 15 20 20 unknown
Georgia-O3L 15 15 10 20
Georgia-02C 15 20 10 20
Georgia-05E 15 20 25 unknown
Georgia-01R 10 10 15 15
York 10 10 5 unknown
Georgia-07W, Tifguard 10 15 10 unknown
Georgia-06G 10 25 25  
 
Crop rotation with non-legume crop
Years Between
Peanut Crop
Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
0 NA 25 25 20
1 NA 15 20 15
2 NA 10 10 10
3 or more NA 5 5 5
 
Tillage
Tillage Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
conventional 15 10 0 0
reduced 5 0 0 5
 
Field History
Previous disease
problems in the field?
Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
No NA 0 0 0
Yes NA 10 15 10
 
Irrigation
Does the field
receive irrigation?
Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
No NA 0 0 0
Yes NA 10 5 10
 
Planting Date
Peanuts are planted: Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
Prior to May 1 30 0 10 0
May 1 to May 10 15 0 5 0
May 11 to May 31 5 5 0 0
June 1 to June 10 10 10 0 5
After June 10 15 10 0 5
 
Row pattern
Peanuts are planted in: Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
Single rows 15 0 5 0
Twin rows 5 0 0 0
 
Plant population (final stand, not seeding rate)
Peanuts are planted in: Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
Less than 3 plants per foot 25 NA 0 NA
3 to 4 plants per foot 15 NA 0 NA
More than 4 plants per foot 5 NA 5 NA
 
At-Plant Insecticide
Insecticide Used Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
None 15 NA NA NA
Other than Thimet 20G or Phorate 20G 15 NA NA NA
Thimet 20G, Phorate 20G 5 NA NA NA
 
Classic Herbicide
Classic Herbicide Usage Spotted Wilt
Points
Leaf Spot Points Soilborne Disease Points
      White mold Limb rot
Classic Applied 5 NA NA NA
No Classic Applied 0 NA NA NA

peanut rx

For each risk index factor, identify the option that best describes the situation in your field. Not all varieties are listed. To view the complete 2010 Peanut Rx, visit the University of Georgia peanut Web site at www.ugapeanuts.com.
 

Calculate Your Risk
  Spotted
Wilt
Leaf
Spot   
White
Mold
Rhizoctonia
Limb Rot
Variety selection        
Crop rotation        
Tillage        
Field history        
Irrigation        
Planting date        
Row pattern        
Plant population        
At-plant insecticide        
Classic herbicide        

 

Interpret Your Index Values
  Spotted
Wilt
Leaf
Spot   
White
Mold
Limb
Rot
Low Risk < 65 10-35 10-25 15-25
Moderate Risk 70 -110 40-60 30-50 30-40
High Risk >115 65-100 55-80 45-75
 
In a year when tomato spotted wilt virus incidence is high statewide or in your region, even fields with low risk level may experience significant losses. Consider the following recommendations to reduce your spotted wilt risk level:
• Use less susceptible varieties.
• Adjust planting date.
• Consult the complete Peanut Rx™ for additional options that may also provide limited benefit.

A Few Notes About Risk Levels
When weather conditions are favorable for fungal diseases, especially when rainfall is abundant, even fields at initial “low risk” to fungal diseases may become “high risk.”

If high risk is indicated, growers should use a full fungicide input program.

For medium-risk fields, growers can expect better performance from standard fungicide programs. Reduced-fungicide programs in research studies have been successfully implemented when conditions are not favorable for disease spread.

For low-risk fields, producers have made management decisions that offer maximum benefit for reducing the potential for severe disease. These fields are candidates for modified disease management programs with a reduced number of fungicide applications.

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