Tag Archives: Weed Control

Palmer Amaranth Adaptability

This weed’s ability to survive goes beyond its penchant for developing resistance to herbicides. By Ramon Leon, Extension Weed Specialist, West Florida REC, and Jay Ferrell, Extension Weed Specialist, Agronomy Department, University of Florida Palmer amaranth, commonly referred to as Palmer pigweed, is perhaps the most problematic weed in the southern United States, especially in row-crop production. This weed can ... Read More »

Weed Control Options

Peanut growers are fortunate to have 18 active ingredients registered for use as herbicides. In general, these herbicides are very effective when applied at the appropriate rate and time. Failure to start clean at planting, residual herbicides that are not activated with timely irrigation or rainfall, postemergence applications to weeds larger than 3 inches tall and unfavorable environmental conditions, such ... Read More »

Peanut Pointers

DAVID JORDAN North Carolina State University Extension Agronomist In-furrow Compatibility Issues If your peanuts are already in the ground, your preplant, preplant incorporated and preemergence herbicides have been applied, and your thrips and tomato spotted wilt programs are in place. Early season weed and thrips control can have a major impact on yield, and certainly achieving a desirable stand is ... Read More »

Peanut Pointers

SCOTT MONFORT University of Georgia Extension Agronomist Don’t Cut Corners With Pests The peanut season has begun on a warm note. To date, we have only received a few cold days going into March. Luckily, rain has been a part of the weather patterns replenishing many of our ponds and aquifers. Looking at the short-term models, the current weather patterns ... Read More »

Weed Management

Florida Pusley (Richardia scabra) Florida pusley is a low-growing, annual weed species that appears almost prostrate. It can be effectively controlled only with pre-plant incorporated herbicides. Florida pusley has bright green leaves with a distinctive recessed mid-vein. The stems are very hairy and may have a purplish appearance. The flowers are white with six petals in a star-shaped whorl.   ... Read More »

Peanut Pointers

DAVID JORDAN North Carolina State University Extension Agronomist Keep Plants Healthy July will bring issues associated with disease management, cleaning up fields with escaped weeds and the possibility of insect issues. For Virginia market types, it is not too late to apply gypsum. If for some reasons there are delays, applications of gypsum into late July and early August are ... Read More »

Mid- To Late-Season Options: What’s available for weed control after early season herbicides dissipate?

By Peter Dotray and James Grichar, Texas A&M AgriLife Research Preplant and preemergence herbicides have likely done what they can, and new weed flushes are starting to emerge. Herbicides applied early postemergence that do not have soil activity may give way to new weed flushes as well. In other words, good early season weed control may need some attention because ... Read More »

Peanut Pointers

DAVID JORDAN North Carolina State University Extension Agronomist A Lot To Do This Month June brings a number of key production and pest management decisions for Virginia-type peanut. The calcium needs of both Virginia market types and jumbo runners we are currently growing require gypsum application during flowering and kernel development. Application is generally made around 40 days after planting. ... Read More »

Peanut Pointers

DAVID JORDAN North Carolina State University Extension Agronomist Manage Weeds, Thrips As we move into May the most critical first step is to get a good stand with the optimum plant population. This varies some by region and market type. For Virginia types, the standard recommendation is to have four plants per foot, which requires planting five seed per foot. ... Read More »

Peanut Pointers

DAVID JORDAN North Carolina State University Extension Agronomist Tools Help Identify Risk Considering all the possibilities at planting can be daunting. Having a plan is essential and being able to adjust as needed, and quickly, are keys to success. Over the years, I have been responsible for handling local arrangements for several mid-size meetings like our annual APRES meeting. As ... Read More »